September 18–19, 2023

September

18

,

15:30

CEST

CET

/

9:30 am

EDT

EST

18

,

2023

September 18–19, 2023

September

18

15:30

CEST

/

9:30 am

PM

18

,

2023

,

September 18–19, 2023

Clinton Global Initiative

Watch Clinton Global Initiative live on We Don't Have Time

Clinton Global Initiative

September

18

,

15:30

CEST

CET

/

9:30 am

EDT

EST

18

,

2023

,

September 18–19, 2023

September

18

at

15:30

CEST

/

9:30 am

EST

EDT

18

,

2023

September 18–19, 2023

Clinton Global Initiative

Watch Clinton Global Initiative live on We Don't Have Time

Clinton Global Initiative

With more than 2,000 leaders attending and 3,900 Commitments, the 2022 Clinton Global Initiative meeting was remarkable.

On September 18-19, the Clinton Global Initiative will gather again in New York City. This year’s meeting will focus on what it takes to keep going—to maintain and advance progress, in spite of the difficulties that arise, and increase our capacity to cross the divides and make common cause with one another wherever possible to build a stronger future for all. We’ll hear from those who are tackling some of today’s most pressing issues, including climate change, health inequities, food insecurity, economic inequality, threats to democracy around the world, and record-breaking refugee displacement. We will examine ways to channel energy and investment to scale solutions that are already improving people’s lives, and explore how tools like AI can be responsibly harnessed for good.

Join us live on We Don't Have Time.

This broadcast is part of The Climate Hub at Climate Week NYC. Full day-by-day program.

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September 18

Live today

8:00 am – 9:00 am EDT — Tides Turning: How to Accelerate Sustainable Practices for Ocean Conservation

Oceans cover 70 percent of Earth’s surface and produce at least half of the oxygen we breathe, regulate the climate, provide a source of food and biodiversity, and drive economies around the world. Ocean health is threatened by human activity such as plastic pollution and industrial waste and struggles to gain traction in the international climate space. However, innovators and leaders are establishing marine protected areas, developing debt restructuring programs to allow governments to prioritize the protection of coastal areas, and telling stories to inspire action at the individual and policy levels. We will explore together how to keep this momentum going to protect this vital resource for ourselves and for the planet.

Speakers:

  • Sam Bencheghib, Co-founder, Sungai Watch
  • Maura Healey, Governor, Commonwealth Of Massachusetts
  • Marie-May Jeremie, CEO, Seychelles Conservation And Climate Adaptation Trust
  • Whitney Johnston, Director of Ocean Sustainability, Salesforce
  • Lewis Pugh, Patron Of Oceans, United Nations Environment Programme (Unep)
  • Asha De Vos, Founder And Executive Director, Oceanswell

Organizers:

9:30 am – 11:00 am EDT — Keep Going

As the CGI community knows, making — and keeping — commitments, isn’t easy. Obstacles can arise, global trendlines can disrupt local solutions, and even sustaining the energy and focus to drive projects to completion can waver.

Despite this, we know the antidote is as simple as it is true — we must keep going. From farming cooperatives in Kenya; boardrooms in Manhattan, to food pantries in Appalachia; classrooms in Medellin, to salt flats in India, to community shelters in Ukraine — people around the world wake up every day and make the choice keep going. While these choices individually may be small and focused, taken together, they build the momentum needed to overcome the global challenges we face.

Last year, the CGI community mobilized for the first time in six years to make over 140 Commitments to Action to address global challenges. Just as climate change, economic inequality, growing health disparities, and backsliding for gender equity continue, we must continue to choose action. We must be nimble, focused, and clear-eyed in our objectives. But most importantly, we cannot allow the scale of the challenges we face to overwhelm the solutions we can bring to bear. We must keep going.

Speakers:

  • Ziv Aviram, Founder And President - Aviram Foundation
  • Wingdie Bertrand, Advisor On Adolescent Youth Health, Gender And Development Programs And Partners In Health Ambassador - Partners In Health
  • Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director - Joint United Nations Programme On HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
  • Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair - Clinton Foundation
  • Hillary Rodham Clinton, 67th U.S Secretary Of State
  • President Bill Clinton, 42nd President Of The United States; Founder And Board Chair, Clinton Foundation
  • His Holiness Pope Francis
  • Ashley Judd, Goodwill Ambassador - United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
  • Lorenzo Lewis, Founder And Executive Director - The Confess Project Of America
  • Reshma Saujani, Founder and CEO, Moms First
  • Ai Weiwei, Artist

Organizers:

11:30 am – 12:30 pm EDT — Turning Down The Heat: How Cities Can Prepare For Extreme Temperatures

Oceans cover 70 percent of Earth’s surface and produce at least half of the oxygen we breathe, regulate the climate, provide a source of food and biodiversity, and drive economies around the world. Ocean health is threatened by human activity such as plastic pollution and industrial waste and struggles to gain traction in the international climate space. However, innovators and leaders are establishing marine protected areas, developing debt restructuring programs to allow governments to prioritize the protection of coastal areas, and telling stories to inspire action at the individual and policy levels. We will explore together how to keep this momentum going to protect this vital resource for ourselves and for the planet.

Speakers:

  • Esther An, Chief Sustainability Officer, City Developments Limited
  • Sarah Kapnick, Chief Scientist, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration (Noaa)
  • Eugenia Kargbo, Chief Heat Officer, Freetown City Council
  • Buddy Shah, CEO, Clinton Health Access Initiative (Chai)
  • Nikhil Swaminathan, CEO, Grist

Organizers:

11:30 am – 1:00 pm EDT — Scaling What Works: How To Advance Sustainable And Regenerative Agriculture In The Food And Fashion Sectors

Feeding and clothing Earth’s population is a significant agricultural undertaking, but the current mass production of food and clothing is not sustainable. The fashion and apparel industry contributes ten percent of annual global carbon emissions, while food systems produce around 30 percent of emissions. According to the World Wildlife Foundation, a shift to regenerative agriculture could contribute 20 percent of the climate mitigation needed to keep temperature increases below the 1.5°C target, but these sectors are not scaling these practices fast enough. Food and fashion, as two of the widest-reaching and most influential industries, can set sustainable trends and inspire a positive ripple effect while tapping into the consumer demand for sustainably sourced products. Through intentional investment, education, and diverse cross-sector partnerships, we can provide affordable, healthy food and ethically sourced materials without doing further damage to the planet while also benefiting businesses.

Speakers:

  • Gabe Brown, Regenerative Farmer and Author
  • Jason Buechel, CEO, Whole Foods Market
  • Nishanth Chopra, Director, Oshadi Collective
  • Julia Collins, Founder and CEO, Planet Fwd
  • Jeannie Renne-Malone, Vice President of Global Sustainability, VF Corporation
  • Josh Tickell, Co-Director, Common Ground Film
  • Sally Uren, CEO, Forum For The Future
  • Mia Vaughnes, Founder And Developer, Good Neighbor Gardens

Organizers:

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm EDT — Funding Earth’s Future: How To Scale Climate Finance In Frontline Communities

The financial investment to mitigate the climate crisis is staggering with the greatest need in frontline communities. While ongoing conversations are focused on who will bear this immense financial burden, we must support leaders who are taking creative and innovative steps toward climate resilience. Inaction is not an option when there are opportunities to develop partnerships with organizations that have shovel-ready projects and to scale innovative financing models that mobilize capital. There are adaptation and mitigation efforts happening all over the world, yet capital remains a key missing piece.

Organizers:

September 19

Live today

8:00 am – 9:00 am EDT — Frontline Leaders: How To Drive Resources To Island States Leading The Way For A Climate Resilient Future

Island states around the world sit on the forefront of climate change, forced to contend with extreme economic, ecological, and social shock. They have begun leading the global charge to implement progressive solutions and mitigation strategies, presenting an opportunity for the global community to learn from, support, replicate, and scale their efforts. On the frontlines of climate change, island states are rapidly writing a new playbook for planning climate resilient communities. Their work has centered cultural diversity in response and resilience efforts. National, state, and territory governments have advanced aggressive policies to promote renewable energy, accelerate ocean conservation, and adopt strategies to spur economic development through local NGOs. Through their efforts, island states are advancing the fight against climate change as the global community learns from, supports, replicates, and scales their best practices.

Organizers:

9:30 am – 11:00 am EDT — A Seat at the Table

Today over 300 million people are food insecure – more than double the number in 2020 — due to conflict, climate change, and inflation.From nations around the world to neighborhoods in Manhattan, the global food crisis is upending years of international coordination and progress.

Tactical steps are necessary across the entire food and agricultural spectrum to reverse these alarming trendlines, and we all must find new ways to partner to address both the short- and long-term impacts of the food crisis. Whether it’s the lack of productive land due to climate change, the shrinking livelihood opportunities for farmers around the world, or the loss of dignity a parent experiences when struggling to provide food for their child, new approaches are required to fill these voids.

Developing innovative partnerships that meet the moment we’re inis paramount to addressing the food crisis, and begs the question —who else should have a seat at the table?

Organizers:

11:30 am – 12:30 pm EDT — Nature-based Solutions: How To Harness Our Greatest Assets For Climate Resilience

The Nature Conservancy estimates nearly one-third of greenhouse gases can be captured through nature-based solutions like forestry management. The goal of reducing our carbon footprint through offsets is an ideal win-win for both nature and society, but as businesses move to implement these solutions, there is warranted skepticism about the integrity of the proposals and the legitimacy of the promises made by carbon-offset markets. There is also a need to balance the pursuit of carbon neutrality in the global economy with the role and needs of indigenous communities as stewards of the environment. By standardizing best practices for carbon offsets and empowering local and indigenous communities by including them in the decision-making that directly impacts their lives, we can strive for greater transparency and integrity in the carbon-offset market to benefit both forests and people.

Organizers:

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm EDT — Accelerating The Transition To Renewable Energy: How To Scale Public-private Partnerships

Renewable energy — including solar, wind, hydropower, biofuels, and others — is at the center of the transition to less carbon-intensive and more sustainable global energy systems. As the world absorbs a global energy crisis from Russia, renewable energy capacity has grown rapidly in recent years, driven by policy support and sharp cost reductions for solar and wind power in particular. This encouraging trend is expected to accelerate in 2023 and beyond, but it will require continued cooperation to address lower-cost energy security. This session will explore where some of the most promising developments are taking place and examine the factors necessary for their success.

Organizers:

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm EDT — Curiosity, Wonder, and Awe

The world around us is vast and largely unexplored. From the uncharted depths of our deepest oceans to the ever-expanding universe beyond planet Earth; from the evolving understanding of the human brain to the unknown ways every living organism on earth interact or communicates, humanity is just one small part of an incomprehensibly larger story that spans billions of years and infinite celestial bodies.

To understand the world around us, we stay curious, explore, ask questions. We witness small acts of humanity and big moments of wonder.

A wave of new research suggests there’s more we can — and should— be doing to understand the world around us. Recent scientific studies on human emotion have suggested that being in awe — the feeling we get in the presence of something vast that challenges our understanding of the world — can have numerous cognitive, physiological and social benefits; leading management consultancies point to curiosity as the most effective trait for transformational corporate leadership; and early childhood brain scientists confirm that encouraging children to experience the sensation of wonder can help expand their neural pathways.

As we continue to battle our oldest demons — battles of “us” versus“them,” cooperation versus conflict, forward versus backward — and confront new and human-made challenges like climate change and responsibly using artificial intelligence, we must continue to develop new and imaginative ways to unlock the full potential of solutions that are being identified. As the CGI community prepares to leave New YorkCity to take action together once again, we must seek opportunities to wonder about what we’ve yet to create or understand; stay curious about what — and who — we don’t yet know; and remain in awe of the people and solutions around us that are working to change the world.

Organizers:

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This broadcast is part of The Climate Hub at Climate Week NYC. Full day-by-day program.

September 18

8:00 am – 9:00 am EDT — Tides Turning: How to Accelerate Sustainable Practices for Ocean Conservation

Oceans cover 70 percent of Earth’s surface and produce at least half of the oxygen we breathe, regulate the climate, provide a source of food and biodiversity, and drive economies around the world. Ocean health is threatened by human activity such as plastic pollution and industrial waste and struggles to gain traction in the international climate space. However, innovators and leaders are establishing marine protected areas, developing debt restructuring programs to allow governments to prioritize the protection of coastal areas, and telling stories to inspire action at the individual and policy levels. We will explore together how to keep this momentum going to protect this vital resource for ourselves and for the planet.

Speakers:

  • Sam Bencheghib, Co-founder, Sungai Watch
  • Maura Healey, Governor, Commonwealth Of Massachusetts
  • Marie-May Jeremie, CEO, Seychelles Conservation And Climate Adaptation Trust
  • Whitney Johnston, Director of Ocean Sustainability, Salesforce
  • Lewis Pugh, Patron Of Oceans, United Nations Environment Programme (Unep)
  • Asha De Vos, Founder And Executive Director, Oceanswell

Organizers:

9:30 am – 11:00 am EDT — Keep Going

As the CGI community knows, making — and keeping — commitments, isn’t easy. Obstacles can arise, global trendlines can disrupt local solutions, and even sustaining the energy and focus to drive projects to completion can waver.

Despite this, we know the antidote is as simple as it is true — we must keep going. From farming cooperatives in Kenya; boardrooms in Manhattan, to food pantries in Appalachia; classrooms in Medellin, to salt flats in India, to community shelters in Ukraine — people around the world wake up every day and make the choice keep going. While these choices individually may be small and focused, taken together, they build the momentum needed to overcome the global challenges we face.

Last year, the CGI community mobilized for the first time in six years to make over 140 Commitments to Action to address global challenges. Just as climate change, economic inequality, growing health disparities, and backsliding for gender equity continue, we must continue to choose action. We must be nimble, focused, and clear-eyed in our objectives. But most importantly, we cannot allow the scale of the challenges we face to overwhelm the solutions we can bring to bear. We must keep going.

Speakers:

  • Ziv Aviram, Founder And President - Aviram Foundation
  • Wingdie Bertrand, Advisor On Adolescent Youth Health, Gender And Development Programs And Partners In Health Ambassador - Partners In Health
  • Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director - Joint United Nations Programme On HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
  • Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair - Clinton Foundation
  • Hillary Rodham Clinton, 67th U.S Secretary Of State
  • President Bill Clinton, 42nd President Of The United States; Founder And Board Chair, Clinton Foundation
  • His Holiness Pope Francis
  • Ashley Judd, Goodwill Ambassador - United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
  • Lorenzo Lewis, Founder And Executive Director - The Confess Project Of America
  • Reshma Saujani, Founder and CEO, Moms First
  • Ai Weiwei, Artist

Organizers:

11:30 am – 12:30 pm EDT — Turning Down The Heat: How Cities Can Prepare For Extreme Temperatures

Oceans cover 70 percent of Earth’s surface and produce at least half of the oxygen we breathe, regulate the climate, provide a source of food and biodiversity, and drive economies around the world. Ocean health is threatened by human activity such as plastic pollution and industrial waste and struggles to gain traction in the international climate space. However, innovators and leaders are establishing marine protected areas, developing debt restructuring programs to allow governments to prioritize the protection of coastal areas, and telling stories to inspire action at the individual and policy levels. We will explore together how to keep this momentum going to protect this vital resource for ourselves and for the planet.

Speakers:

  • Esther An, Chief Sustainability Officer, City Developments Limited
  • Sarah Kapnick, Chief Scientist, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration (Noaa)
  • Eugenia Kargbo, Chief Heat Officer, Freetown City Council
  • Buddy Shah, CEO, Clinton Health Access Initiative (Chai)
  • Nikhil Swaminathan, CEO, Grist

Organizers:

11:30 am – 1:00 pm EDT — Scaling What Works: How To Advance Sustainable And Regenerative Agriculture In The Food And Fashion Sectors

Feeding and clothing Earth’s population is a significant agricultural undertaking, but the current mass production of food and clothing is not sustainable. The fashion and apparel industry contributes ten percent of annual global carbon emissions, while food systems produce around 30 percent of emissions. According to the World Wildlife Foundation, a shift to regenerative agriculture could contribute 20 percent of the climate mitigation needed to keep temperature increases below the 1.5°C target, but these sectors are not scaling these practices fast enough. Food and fashion, as two of the widest-reaching and most influential industries, can set sustainable trends and inspire a positive ripple effect while tapping into the consumer demand for sustainably sourced products. Through intentional investment, education, and diverse cross-sector partnerships, we can provide affordable, healthy food and ethically sourced materials without doing further damage to the planet while also benefiting businesses.

Speakers:

  • Gabe Brown, Regenerative Farmer and Author
  • Jason Buechel, CEO, Whole Foods Market
  • Nishanth Chopra, Director, Oshadi Collective
  • Julia Collins, Founder and CEO, Planet Fwd
  • Jeannie Renne-Malone, Vice President of Global Sustainability, VF Corporation
  • Josh Tickell, Co-Director, Common Ground Film
  • Sally Uren, CEO, Forum For The Future
  • Mia Vaughnes, Founder And Developer, Good Neighbor Gardens

Organizers:

2:30 pm – 4:00 pm EDT — Funding Earth’s Future: How To Scale Climate Finance In Frontline Communities

The financial investment to mitigate the climate crisis is staggering with the greatest need in frontline communities. While ongoing conversations are focused on who will bear this immense financial burden, we must support leaders who are taking creative and innovative steps toward climate resilience. Inaction is not an option when there are opportunities to develop partnerships with organizations that have shovel-ready projects and to scale innovative financing models that mobilize capital. There are adaptation and mitigation efforts happening all over the world, yet capital remains a key missing piece.

Organizers:

September 19

8:00 am – 9:00 am EDT — Frontline Leaders: How To Drive Resources To Island States Leading The Way For A Climate Resilient Future

Island states around the world sit on the forefront of climate change, forced to contend with extreme economic, ecological, and social shock. They have begun leading the global charge to implement progressive solutions and mitigation strategies, presenting an opportunity for the global community to learn from, support, replicate, and scale their efforts. On the frontlines of climate change, island states are rapidly writing a new playbook for planning climate resilient communities. Their work has centered cultural diversity in response and resilience efforts. National, state, and territory governments have advanced aggressive policies to promote renewable energy, accelerate ocean conservation, and adopt strategies to spur economic development through local NGOs. Through their efforts, island states are advancing the fight against climate change as the global community learns from, supports, replicates, and scales their best practices.

Organizers:

9:30 am – 11:00 am EDT — A Seat at the Table

Today over 300 million people are food insecure – more than double the number in 2020 — due to conflict, climate change, and inflation.From nations around the world to neighborhoods in Manhattan, the global food crisis is upending years of international coordination and progress.

Tactical steps are necessary across the entire food and agricultural spectrum to reverse these alarming trendlines, and we all must find new ways to partner to address both the short- and long-term impacts of the food crisis. Whether it’s the lack of productive land due to climate change, the shrinking livelihood opportunities for farmers around the world, or the loss of dignity a parent experiences when struggling to provide food for their child, new approaches are required to fill these voids.

Developing innovative partnerships that meet the moment we’re inis paramount to addressing the food crisis, and begs the question —who else should have a seat at the table?

Organizers:

11:30 am – 12:30 pm EDT — Nature-based Solutions: How To Harness Our Greatest Assets For Climate Resilience

The Nature Conservancy estimates nearly one-third of greenhouse gases can be captured through nature-based solutions like forestry management. The goal of reducing our carbon footprint through offsets is an ideal win-win for both nature and society, but as businesses move to implement these solutions, there is warranted skepticism about the integrity of the proposals and the legitimacy of the promises made by carbon-offset markets. There is also a need to balance the pursuit of carbon neutrality in the global economy with the role and needs of indigenous communities as stewards of the environment. By standardizing best practices for carbon offsets and empowering local and indigenous communities by including them in the decision-making that directly impacts their lives, we can strive for greater transparency and integrity in the carbon-offset market to benefit both forests and people.

Organizers:

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm EDT — Accelerating The Transition To Renewable Energy: How To Scale Public-private Partnerships

Renewable energy — including solar, wind, hydropower, biofuels, and others — is at the center of the transition to less carbon-intensive and more sustainable global energy systems. As the world absorbs a global energy crisis from Russia, renewable energy capacity has grown rapidly in recent years, driven by policy support and sharp cost reductions for solar and wind power in particular. This encouraging trend is expected to accelerate in 2023 and beyond, but it will require continued cooperation to address lower-cost energy security. This session will explore where some of the most promising developments are taking place and examine the factors necessary for their success.

Organizers:

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm EDT — Curiosity, Wonder, and Awe

The world around us is vast and largely unexplored. From the uncharted depths of our deepest oceans to the ever-expanding universe beyond planet Earth; from the evolving understanding of the human brain to the unknown ways every living organism on earth interact or communicates, humanity is just one small part of an incomprehensibly larger story that spans billions of years and infinite celestial bodies.

To understand the world around us, we stay curious, explore, ask questions. We witness small acts of humanity and big moments of wonder.

A wave of new research suggests there’s more we can — and should— be doing to understand the world around us. Recent scientific studies on human emotion have suggested that being in awe — the feeling we get in the presence of something vast that challenges our understanding of the world — can have numerous cognitive, physiological and social benefits; leading management consultancies point to curiosity as the most effective trait for transformational corporate leadership; and early childhood brain scientists confirm that encouraging children to experience the sensation of wonder can help expand their neural pathways.

As we continue to battle our oldest demons — battles of “us” versus“them,” cooperation versus conflict, forward versus backward — and confront new and human-made challenges like climate change and responsibly using artificial intelligence, we must continue to develop new and imaginative ways to unlock the full potential of solutions that are being identified. As the CGI community prepares to leave New YorkCity to take action together once again, we must seek opportunities to wonder about what we’ve yet to create or understand; stay curious about what — and who — we don’t yet know; and remain in awe of the people and solutions around us that are working to change the world.

Organizers:

Clinton Global Initiative

Select Speakers

President Bill Clinton

 (
)

Founder and Board Chair, Clinton Foundation and 42nd President of the United States

President Bill Clinton is the Founder and Board Chair of the Clinton Foundation and the 42nd President of the United States.

Chelsea Clinton

 (
)

Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation

Chelsea Clinton is the Vice Chair of the Clinton Foundation.

Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton

 (
)

Former U.S. Secretary of State

Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton is a Former U.S. Secretary of State.

Matt Damon

 (
)

Co-Founder, Water.org

Matt Damon is the Co-Founder, Water.org.

Philip E. Davis

 (
)

Prime Minister, The Bahamas

Philip E. Davis is the Prime Minister of the Bahamas.

Ilan Goldfajn

 (
)

President, Inter-American Development Bank

Ilan Goldfajn is the President of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Kathy Hochul

 (
)

Governor, New York

Kathy Hochul is the Governor, of New York.

Ashley Judd

 (
)

Arsht-Rock Chief Heat Officer, Freetown, Sierra Leone

Ashley Judd is Arsht-Rock Chief Heat Officer, Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Sophia Kianni

 (
IR, US
)

U.S. Representative on the United Nations Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change

Sophia Kianni is an Iranian-American environmentalist studying climate science and public policy at Stanford University. She is the founder and executive director of Climate Cardinals, an international nonprofit with 8,000 volunteers in 40+ countries working to translate climate information into over 100 languages. She represents the U.S as the youngest member of the inaugural United Nations Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change. She has been named VICE Media’s youngest Human of the Year, a National Geographic Young Explorer, and BuzzFeed’s youngest Woman to Watch.

Sage Lenier

 (
)

Founder & Executive Director, Sustainable & Just Future

Sage Lenier is the Founder & Executive Director at Sustainable & Just Future.

Cindy Mccain

 (
)

Executive Director of the World Food Programme

Cindy Mccain is the Executive Director of the World Food Programme.

Paul Stormoen

 (
SE
)

CEO, OX2

Paul Stormoen is OX2 Chief Executive Officer. OX2 develops and sells wind and solar farms. OX2 has taken a leading position in large-scale onshore wind power over the past 17 years.

Select Speakers

President Bill Clinton

 (
)
Founder and Board Chair, Clinton Foundation and 42nd President of the United States

President Bill Clinton is the Founder and Board Chair of the Clinton Foundation and the 42nd President of the United States.

Read less
Read more

Chelsea Clinton

 (
)
Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation

Chelsea Clinton is the Vice Chair of the Clinton Foundation.

Read less
Read more

Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton

 (
)
Former U.S. Secretary of State

Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton is a Former U.S. Secretary of State.

Read less
Read more

Matt Damon

 (
)
Co-Founder, Water.org

Matt Damon is the Co-Founder, Water.org.

Read less
Read more

Philip E. Davis

 (
)
Prime Minister, The Bahamas

Philip E. Davis is the Prime Minister of the Bahamas.

Read less
Read more

Ilan Goldfajn

 (
)
President, Inter-American Development Bank

Ilan Goldfajn is the President of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Read less
Read more

Kathy Hochul

 (
)
Governor, New York

Kathy Hochul is the Governor, of New York.

Read less
Read more

Ashley Judd

 (
)
Arsht-Rock Chief Heat Officer, Freetown, Sierra Leone

Ashley Judd is Arsht-Rock Chief Heat Officer, Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Read less
Read more

Sophia Kianni

 (
IR, US
)
U.S. Representative on the United Nations Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change

Sophia Kianni is an Iranian-American environmentalist studying climate science and public policy at Stanford University. She is the founder and executive director of Climate Cardinals, an international nonprofit with 8,000 volunteers in 40+ countries working to translate climate information into over 100 languages. She represents the U.S as the youngest member of the inaugural United Nations Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change. She has been named VICE Media’s youngest Human of the Year, a National Geographic Young Explorer, and BuzzFeed’s youngest Woman to Watch.

Read less
Read more

Sage Lenier

 (
)
Founder & Executive Director, Sustainable & Just Future

Sage Lenier is the Founder & Executive Director at Sustainable & Just Future.

Read less
Read more

Cindy Mccain

 (
)
Executive Director of the World Food Programme

Cindy Mccain is the Executive Director of the World Food Programme.

Read less
Read more

Paul Stormoen

 (
SE
)
CEO, OX2

Paul Stormoen is OX2 Chief Executive Officer. OX2 develops and sells wind and solar farms. OX2 has taken a leading position in large-scale onshore wind power over the past 17 years.

Read less
Read more

Clinton Global Initiative

Organized by

Visit website

Clinton Global Initiative

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The Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) brings together established and emerging global leaders to create and implement solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges. CGI works with partners to develop Commitments to Action — new, specific, and measurable actions in climate resilience, health equity, and inclusive economic recovery and growth.

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